Accepting and Declining Job Offers

Congratulations, you've received an offer for a job or internship!


Young woman standing in front of a brown table with an open laptop, an open notebook and pen, mug and food on top. Her arms are bent with closed fists raised to her face. Her face conveys excitement. Behind her: the room is grey, with a grey sofa, a light brown room divider, and a white shirt hangs from the room divider.
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Accepting an Offer of Employment

  • When you receive an offer, acknowledge it and be gracious; thank the employer and show enthusiasm.

  • Don't accept a job offer on the spot! Make sure you weigh your choices carefully and ensure that you are making the best possible choice for your career goals. Reflect!

  • Develop a written pros and cons list of each job offer. Do you have enough information to make a good decision? Be sure to consider the following: the benefits package, relocation assistance if moving to a new city, professional development allowances and/or tuition reimbursement if you want to continue furthering your education.

  • If you have other offers pending that are higher on your priority list, contact those employers to let them know about your new offer (without giving details) and ask when they are planning to make their decision.

  • When you accept an offer, you are obligated to that position even if you get a better offer later. Do not accept an offer unless and until you are sure of your commitment. Once you accept a position, you should withdraw yourself from other positions you are being considered for, and stop submitting new applications.


Declining an Offer of Employment

  • If you choose to decline a job offer, do so tactfully and preferably by phone. If you choose to decline an offer because another offer is a better fit for your interests and goals, it is fine to state this, without giving details about why the declined offer is not the best fit. It is not necessary to state whose offer you accepted.

  • Avoid saying anything negative in writing about the employer, even if you had a negative experience.

  • Remember that this employer may be a contact for you in the future. Be professional and courteous.


Reversing your decision on a Job Offer

  • This is a very unfavorable practice!

  • Reversing your decision on a job offer may damage not just your professional reputation, but that of Career Services and CSU in general. Your actions can jeopardize opportunities for other students. Avoid getting into this position in the first place. Go back to the top of this document! Reflect and make your “pros” and “cons” list thoroughly so that you are confident when you accept or decline an offer!

  • “Ghosting” an employer is damaging to your personal and professional reputation. Do not do this. If you have trouble with conflict or saying no, contact Career Services to receive coaching on this topic.

  • When you accept an offer, you are obligated to that position even if you get a better offer later. Once you accept a position, you should withdraw yourself from other positions you are being considered for and stop submitting new applications.

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